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Mark Twain
Only one thing is impossible for god: to find any sense in any copyright law on the planet. (35)


A good summary of Fair Use Guidelines for Classroom Teachers

http://www.halldavidson.net/downloads.html Hall Davidson's Workshop Materials on Copyright Guidelines

In response to a staff question about plagiarism and copyright I am sharing the following information with everyone. Please read the entire page before coming to an understanding. If you want more information click on this link: http://www.utsystem.edu/OGC/intellectualProperty/copypol2.htm#mm



WANT TO TEST YOUR KNOWLEDGE: http://www.csus.edu/indiv/p/peachj/edte230/copyright/quiz.htm

Another great resource: http://www.csus.edu/indiv/p/peachj/edte230/copyright/



copyright.gifhttp://www.utsystem.edu/OGC/intellectualProperty/copypol2.htm#mm

FAIR USE


http://teachertube.com/viewVideo.php?video_id=2523&title=A_Fair_y__Use_Tale








Showing Movies:
Schools can purchase licenses to shows movies at: http://k12.movlic.com/

What the law says
The Federal Copyright Act (Title 17 of the U.S. Code) governs how copyrighted materials, such as movies, may be used. Neither the rental nor the purchase of a movie carries with it the right to show the movie publicly outside the home, unless the site where the movie is used is properly licensed for public exhibition. Ownership of the movie and the right to use it publicly are two separate issues. The copyright holder retains exclusive public performance rights.
This legal copyright compliance requirement applies to schools, public libraries, daycare facilities, parks, recreation departments, summer camps, churches, private clubs, prisons, lodges, businesses, etc.
This legal requirement applies:
  • Regardless of how the movies are obtained
  • Whether or not an admission fee is charged
  • Whether the facility or organization is commercial or non-profit
  • Whether a federal, state or local agency is involved

Educational Exemption when showing movies
The Educational Exemption, also called the "face-to-face teaching exemption," is a precise activity which allows the legal use of movies in certain types of teaching, in a nonprofit environment. In order for a movie to be considered an "Educational Exemption," all criteria must be met:
  • A teacher or instructor is present.
  • The showing takes place in a classroom setting with only the enrolled students attending.
  • The movie is used as an essential part of the core, required curriculum being taught. (The instructor should be able to show how the use of the motion picture contributes to the overall required course study and syllabus.)
  • The movie being used is a legitimate copy, not taped from a legitimate copy or taped from TV.

Compiled by Crystal Miranda, LBUSD